wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
1. There are new-Who and Torchwood novels, right? Are they any good? (My library doesn't have any, but there's ILL.) I've read, like, one good media tie-in novel in my life. Well, maybe three...

2. An entire plate of roasted veg is not working for me as a dinner. What entree can I serve alongside? Special snowflake preferences: Ideal entrees would be vegetarian (dairy, eggs, and soy okay), or using sausage (TJ's and WF sales provide decent sausage), or easy-to-prepare fish. We're currently roasting some combination of Asian and traditional sweet potatoes, whole shallots, regular and Chantenay carrots, turnips and rutagabas, parsnips, and golden and red beets. Just olive oil, a bit of black pepper, and a bit of salt is what's going in. They come out nicely caramelized on the edges, though not at all wet. (I skip the parsnips and turnips.) I just don't know what to serve with them. Things like lentils and so on seem a little too carby.
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
I thought it was going to be an actual recent genre, but no, it's what I think of as magical realism, but perhaps the ship has sailed with interstitial. If you want to write her about it, the information is here: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128823435&sc=fb&cc=fp#genre

I don't know all that much about the interstitial movement, so if you want to pop over there with links and so forth, it might be good.

She's talking about Miss Hargreaves by Frank Baker, Under Heaven or The Lions of Al-Rassan by Guy Gavriel Kay, and Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke.

I really thought the latter was simply fantasy, if indeed a kind of historical fantasy that mines an era we've rarely seen and written in a particular tone, and without the romantic overtones that HF sometimes has.

Anyway, the comments are rather dumb so far, including the person who thinks that a book titled The Lotus Eaters is engaging in plagiarism (I sincerely hope that person is in secondary school).

Rats.

Mar. 15th, 2009 09:22 am
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
Maybe the reason I had laid off on the fiction-reading in the last few years was that I've been forced to be a morning person and get up at (what other people consider) a reasonable hour. I find it hard to put novels down at night and so getting back into a fiction-reading habit may not be a healthy thing for me. Grumble. Nonfiction is a lot easier to put aside and I don't tend to stay up quite as late with it.

Well, I'll just have to get better at limits and so forth, I suppose.
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
C. and I are working on a book project--since C. is full-time math faculty now (even if it's just for a year), he has big plans. Based on his experiences teaching and stuff I read in my TESOL program, he figures he needs to give his students some extra credit for reading fiction, even though it's a math class. Basically, they don't read for fun, and that tends to have a negative effect on reading skills overall--including reading syllabi and instructions! Of course, even if they do start reading during this semester, it won't pay off quickly, but what the heck--it should make their lives and their teachers' lives easier in the future.

So, we're working on fun and interesting stuff to read. The criteria are pretty loose, but we're trying to come up with books that are
- easily available
- not found in the children's or YA sections, if possible
- engrossing
- not too hard to read for people who aren't used to reading (so, y'know, no [livejournal.com profile] matociquala or [livejournal.com profile] scottlynch, alas)

Bonus points for books that
- have math and science themes
- feature strong female and/or nonwhite characters
- are written by female or nonwhite writers

Most relevant lists online are aimed at kids, who don't mind going in the kids' section! But our target audience is community college students, and I suspect they'd rather not be caught dead there.

I'll get C. to give me a list of what we have so far and I'll add it to this post when I get a chance. In the meantime, though, suggestions?
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
You can pass this on to any bored friends, too.

How would you write a good survey to find out what somebody whose first language is not English likes to read? I'm in the pre-preliminary stages of writing a survey which will have at least two goals: 1) Figure out what kinds of things international students studying English at the intensive English program on my campus would like to read in English, and 2) Figure out what kinds of things the students that I tutor would like to read in English (some of the students I tutor are older, have kids, are permanent residents, etc.). Both groups of students are over 18.Almost none are highly fluent/highly advanced in English.

I want to use it to find popular manga titles among the manga-reading populations (for a project using English manga), and also to get some ideas for what kinds of graded readers, young adult, and adult fiction titles I could recommend to them or would be good for a reading room.

As I've mentioned previously, the reason is not literacy for literacy's sake, but because reading is the place where most people pick up the bulk of their vocabulary, learn sentence patterns, absorb article usage, get a feel for preposition choices, and generally acquire the more idiosyncratic parts of a language.

Most of these students do not read for fun in English, so I can't just ask them directly (though I will include a question about anything they have read in English and enjoyed). Some of them probably don't read for fun in their native languages, either.

Personally, I find it really hard to answer surveys with questions like "What is your favorite book?" (or even "What are your favorite books?"). Another potential pitfall is that genres are culture-specific, and there are genres in other cultures I wouldn't even think to ask about. (For example, there's a "cooking manga" sub-genre of comics in Japan!) So I think it might be best to ask them about specific titles anyway, and just look them up myself on the internet. But I don't know. Possibly asking about movies would work, too--do you think your movie tastes correlate at all with your reading tastes? I suppose mine do...Heck, videogames too, even...

What kinds of questions would you ask?

Profile

wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
wintersweet

April 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
234 5678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30      

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 16th, 2017 09:34 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios