wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
Dear more-British-English-speaking friends, I'm prevailing upon you for your kind assistance once again.

As an adult, would/do you use the word "sweeties" or the word "sweets" or something else to refer to candy and confectionery? And which variety of English do you speak?

I did see what Wikipedia has to say on the matter (don't look! just tell me what you think!) but I don't really trust it, and Google's not very useful for this kind of thing.

I'm asking because there is a tendency among my Japanese clients to say "sweeties" in this case, and it sounds extremely strange in US English, because here that exclusively means "sweetheart" and makes them all sound inadvertently polyamorous or pimptastic ("I'll bring you some sweeties from Tokyo! What kind of sweeties do you like?") However, comma, I am aware that they won't remain in the US forever and when they have a vocabulary word (either as a loanword or something they learned in a British-oriented or archaic textbook) that's unacceptable in the US and acceptable elsewhere, I like to tell them why and where they can and can't use it.

Japanese has a fair number of loanwords from different countries according to which country introduced the item into Japan or became the most successful company selling the item in Japan, and sometimes it's just a tossup between British words and more American words. They also tend to use the word "cake" in a more British way, where if an American says "I'm bringing cakes," they mean they're bringing multiple full size, 8-20+-serving cakes, but if a Japanese person says it, they mean they're bringing several individual-serving pastries or some slices of cake or some cupcakes.

Oh, and I ran into the notion from a British person once that Americans never said "sweets" and only said "candy," so you might wonder why I'm asking. We DO say "sweets" sometimes, even though it sounds a bit formal, because "candy" doesn't include pastry, so it's necessary--particularly when a Japanese person wants to talk about traditional Japanese tea accompaniments. Only a tiny handful of these really qualify as candy OR pastry, so the word "sweets" becomes really necessary. (Check out some wagashi here. Warning: lots of photos; not dial-up friendly. Or you can view some for spring, summer, autumn [which I've also been informed that Americans NEVER say, LOL], and winter.)

Thank you!

(edited to say "Traditional Japanese tea accompaniments" rather than "desserts and," because they're not really desserts.)

EDIT: Okay, feel free to keep commenting, but at this point I think my instinct that British people don't really go around saying "Mm, lunch was a bit salty; got any sweeties stashed in your desk drawer?" has been confirmed to be correct. Although an American would not be likely to say "any sweets" here, it would sound a hell of a lot less weird than "any sweeties." (We'd probably say "anything sweet" or "any candy.")

Augh.

Feb. 5th, 2009 04:13 pm
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
Korea: A Cross Cultural Communication Analyzed is interesting, but it would have been better if the author had done a little more research. He writes "(a) consent (long first syllable) - is what an Australian would call an electric power point. Clearly here we have an incorrect dictionary transposition. The link between 'consent ~ to agree' and electric plug is apparent."

Common sense is a terrible way to do etymology, and while I may natter speculatively in the same vein on LJ, I wouldn't dare publish it in a paper (let alone say "clearly" or "apparent.")

The word he's talking about is from "concentric plug," referring to the type of connection, and I believe that if you check a full-size Japanese or Korean loanword dictionary, it will tell you so. And I am fairly sure that it enters Korean via Japanese, which he fails to acknowledge.

He also identifies only ONE word out of this list of "Konglish" (sic) as originally entering Korean through Japanese: con[s/c]ent, skinship, handle, hotchkiss, eye shopping, fighting. He only acknowledges "hotchkiss" (stapler), but actually, I'm pretty sure that all of these entered Korean through Japanese except for "eye shopping".

I mean, obviously some English must have/could have entered Korean during the Korean War and its aftermath. And some of the Korean words I've run into in the past I can see having spontaneously formed on their own to be virtually identical to Japanese because of some overlap in Japanese and Korean phonetics. It's a bit odd, though, when so many of them are as close as they are, not to mention borrowing the same bits from English with the same far more unlikely quirks of semantic change in terms of specialization, generalization, metonymy, and so on.

Oh well, someday I'll find a book or article that really explains the whole tangled saga of these words.
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
Yay! I found a brief, squished-together explanation of honorific name suffixes in A Reference Grammar of Japanese by Martin. It's a pretty old book, but none of the other books included forms of address at all. They covered, like, name order, but not -sama and stuff. Very weird.

This book implies that -chama is a perfectly ordinary form of address, not indicating it to be any less common than -chan. Was it more common in 1975, or is it just an artifact of the brief treatment, or is it an error, or have I misunderstood?

Irritatingly, it uses the "tyan"-type spellings, but oh well.

Finally, it answered a question: Remember that I was wondering if things like -chan were diminutives or what? Apparently, they're hypercoristics (endearments). Woohoo! That was a term I needed in order to write this.

It's too bad the SJSU library isn't more up to date, but I'm very glad I have access to it for free.

(Edited for incoherency. I shouldn't type and read at the same time.)
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
I would love to be able to read this Japanese Wikipedia article on "Engrish."

I ran across it because I was looking for a longer list like this of supposed English loanwords that are used in Japanese and either are incomprehensible to non-Japanese English speakers or are understandable but sound strange (like saying "mug-cup" instead of "mug"). [livejournal.com profile] sho_sunaga put me onto the original 和製英語 ("made-in-Japan English") article that led me there. One of my students really wants to know which words she needs to change or avoid, which I think is a very good idea. It's great that she has these words to draw on, but just like a native English speaker going to France, it's dangerous to use familiar words willy-nilly without realizing that the meanings and pronunciations of the French mutated when they entered English.

Between the two lists I should be able to put together a good list, but the problem is that I don't know which of these Japanese words are actually really common and which I don't need to worry about teaching to my clients because no one really uses them anyway. :P I can take a guess at which are more common, of course ...
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
Joined http://www.lang-8.com -- generally not a fan of language-exchange websites, but this one is focused on writing correction and includes tools so that you can correct each other's journal posts easily. So I think it'll be useful if I use it in a really focused way as a tool to essentially do Japanese homework. When I study a sentence pattern or grammar point on my own, I'll just write a series of really short journal posts featuring the pattern I'm trying to learn, and hope somebody will correct 'em. :p
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
森林浴

to immerse yourself in the woods; forest bath

森林浴療法

forest immersion therapy
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
Downloaded Firefox 3 today. And you can too... (Help them set a world record!)

Speaking of my computer, I'm having some problems with Japanese input and reading. I'm a little disgusted with OS X, since part of the reason I went Mac in the first place was superior Asian language handling. Yet, when I open my Kanji a Day e-mail in FF for Mac, it displays gibberish about half the time (an example, one that happened to load correctly, is here: http://www.yookoso.com/pages/kanji.php?file=display&grade=JLPT4&date=1 ). When I opened their e-mails on [livejournal.com profile] kyspaz's PC, they consistently displayed correctly. Boo!

I'm also having a more significant problem, which is that about a third to a half of my Japanese friends cannot read my e-mails when I type them in Japanese using the built-in OS X Japanese IME. And no, they're not using cell phones to view my mail. I don't have any idea what's going on here--is the default OS X encoding something funky? Grrr. It's extremely irritating. Help!
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (ergoproxy-me-notgoth)
メルヘン系 --> meruhen kei -> Märchen-kei -> fairy-tale style.

Apparently that's what Kokushoku Sumire (SRA Kokusyoku Sumire) plays. Well, I don't know that it's an actual sub-genre, but I've seen it used to describe them (probably ネオビックトリアン--Neo-Victorian--too, but that's not nearly as interesting). They're somewhere in the neighborhood of dark cabaret, I'd say, minus a bit of the vaudeville ba-da-dum-bump and plus some actual 1900s folk songs, with bonus opera.

Definitely not to everyone's taste. But definitely going on the Asian steampunk mix if I do get enough songs to make one.

I've had these two peculiar songs of theirs sitting on my HD for ages and never thought to try looking them up.

Back to work now...
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
I found two things on Amazon.co.jp that I wanted to buy (given that a replacement Nana DS game is still more than I paid for it). However, two books = 4200 ¥ and shipping is 3300 ¥. So the total's about $75 US. Eep! I need to go to Kinokuniya and see if their rather high markup, plus sales tax, still puts me ahead, or not. I really want both of the books-- 英語多読完全ブックガイド [改訂第2版] is a guide to English books for Japanese learners of English, with everything arranged by difficulty. レベル別日本語多読ライブラリー にほんごよむよむ文庫 is actually a set of 5 short graded readers for learners of Japanese--a resource that is rarer than hen's teeth. If Stephen Krashen is right about how much appropriate-level written input (particularly extended narratives) you really need to acquire a language, students of Japanese are in dire straits until they get to the point of being able to read easy manga. There's next to nothing available for beginning readers of Japanese. But I really need something!

(Actually, after I started writing this I bought the first level of the Japanese graded readers. They're very very simple, but it's good for me anyway. I've read two so far.)


Crazy evidence that your initials and birthdate predispose you to pick certain occupations and places to live. Holy cow, are we really such simple creatures? Is this why C ([livejournal.com profile] assaultdoor) and C (me) live in California and like chickens and cats? Well, I wonder. Implicit egoism is obviously not the entire picture for everything, but I can't help but think the repetition of these sounds and numbers in your life might predispose you a little, if it's a tossup, toward one over the other. I don't think it'll make you like cats if that goes against your personality (the C&C thing is a joke).

Assuming this isn't just an early April Fool's Day joke, I'd love to see this study replicated using both sounds and characters in Japan and China for occupations and residences (you'd have to exclude the location-specific family names just as you would for England, I imagine, but still--you could see if people with the "mountain" hanzi/kanji or radical in their family names are more likely to live in places that aren't the same word but also include "mountain").


DId I mention that I finally watched the two existing Death Note movies, along with [livejournal.com profile] applechailatte and [livejournal.com profile] assaultdoor? Pretty odd (and the writing seemed to suffer a lot in the second half) but enjoyable. I'll check out the manga when I'm rich and can buy manga again.


They're replacing our tub, floor, and toilet in the upstairs bathroom. Boy, is it noisy. When [livejournal.com profile] applechailatte gets back I'm going to ask if she wants to go to England Rose Garden or the library or something. Yikes.


Belated happy birthdays, [livejournal.com profile] slithytove, [livejournal.com profile] ashariel, and [livejournal.com profile] emmalynne! I had this post written but forgot to post it.
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
I think I've posted random neat words/phrases that are listed in http://wwwjdic.com/ before, but here's another one:

戯作三昧 【げさくざんまい】(gesakuzanmai) (n) being absorbed in writing popular novels (cheap fictions); being absorbed in writing something to amuse oneself [G][GI][S][A]

I love it. I don't know if anyone uses this phrase anymore, but I kinda hope they do. :)
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
Rules no one teaches but everyone learns. This is one example of why it is more important to have a well-trained teacher than one whose only qualification is being a native speaker. A well-trained non-native speaker can run circles around an untrained native speaker in a lot of ways.

I don't know if there's research to back it up, but I think the ideal situation for teaching, at least in linguistically homogeneous situations, would be the same as for translation: two well-trained individuals, one from the target language background and one from the local language background.

(I'm still looking for a language school in Japan and language classes in the Bay Area where they teach Japanese with relatively up-to-date pedagogical methods--for example, task-based, communicative, etc. If anyone knows anything, drop me a line. When I asked the place I was interested in going to--the Yamasa Institute--about their teaching methods, they said "We use the direct method." And that's not really good enough--all it means is that the language of instruction is Japanese.)

Unrelatedly, [livejournal.com profile] assaultdoor wants to change mouse-click behavior in Firefox 2 (i.e., change something from the default of control-click to shift-click, or something) and can't find a way to do that. Any ideas? TabMix doesn't do it anymore.
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Hikaru no go-OHMYGOD!-michishirube)
ケーキバイキング!!!
By which I mean "CAKE VIKING!"
By which I mean "DESSERT SMORGASBORD!"

If you're on a diet, you definitely shouldn't click up there or down here.

Oof.

Apr. 15th, 2006 10:12 pm
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (murata-ono no komachi-me)
I think that Coldstone cake might have beaten me. Yikes. Slightly sick to my stomach...Pretty tasty, though. It's [livejournal.com profile] deucelampbell's birthday, you see.

Previously, we had a lot of Japanese food and went to see a few bits of the Cherry Blossom Festival in Japantown, San Francisco. An article at the Chronicle's website says it's the first time there have actually been cherry trees blooming during the festival. Usually, it's too warm and sunny by now, but this year has been cool and rainy. I had better take photos tomorrow.

When we got there we went by the uta karuta demo. After I responded to a couple of words in Japanese, the old ladies made me play, but of course I can't really because I don't have the Hyakunin Isshu memorized. And my ear is slow, if you know what I mean, in Japanese still. However, I could kind of follow along--I hadn't realized the cards are written in hiragana. Score! I actually got one card on my own. One. :p And I impressed the ladies by identifying Ono no Komachi as the author of the poem referenced in this icon. I would totally liven up their weekly games if I lived in SF.

It wasn't anything like the big national uta karuta competitions we saw on TV over New Year's during our honeymoon (or described in the article above), which were really physical. Hands poised like vipers, cards slapped faster than lightning. Here no one was wearing kimono or kneeling on the floor (though we did see plenty of people in kimono during the day).

Then they got very involved in trying to figure out which Heian female poet was depicted on my shirt. They feel it's not Murasaki Shikibu, Ono no Komachi, or Sei Shonagon. They were holding up the paintings on the cards to try to match up the kimono patterns and faces. I managed to flake on who it was, though. I think it was probably either Akazome Emon or Udaisho Mitchitsuna no haha. I always figured there were some hints in her kimono colors and patterns or something...

This makes twice I've inadvertently impressed people through no skill of my own at festivals during matching games. (There was a classical Chinese poetry matching game or something at the Dragon Boat festival I went to my first week in Taiwan. It's a one-off thing unlike uta karuta, and I got it right not because it was a poem I knew, but because it started with a couple of words that almost always are used for parallelism, like you might see an English poem starting "Adjective the noun that adverb verb; Adjective the noun that adverb verb.")

So yeah, now I need to memorize Hyakunin Isshu.

Oooooooh.

Aug. 6th, 2005 11:18 pm
wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (ghibli-mimi-writing-me)
So I was playing with Jim Breen's. I usually go there or to Jeffrey's, both of which live on my Firefox toolbar, to try to figure out various words from the IQ Supli game show, since it's heavy on the word games (yay!). JB itself contains a wealth of information, but good grief, the people who contribute to Unicode have outdone themselves! I knew they were obsessive geeks form all the different code sets Clint showed me when he was looking at it, but check out what you can learn about one Chinese/Japanese character. In the case the example is ping/hei, "peace" (chosen kind of randomly from my various searches, but it is the 60th year to the day since the bomb exploded over Hiroshima, so...). ISN'T THAT COOL? Just getting to read how it's used in various compounds in both Chinese and Japanese is really neat, with the overlap and differences. (What's the "Tang" pronunciation, though? Does it mean I can read all that poetry I translated aloud now and actually hear the rhymes that didn't work in Mandarin? heh.)

I really wish I had enough money to just spend my time studying Chinese and Japanese. And I'd like to tackle a Romance language just to see how hard or easy it is compared to the Asiatic ones. I was sitting in the doctor's office reading a poster on hypertension in Spanish, and I realized I could translate the first paragraph with 80-95% accuracy, despite having formally studied Spanish only for half a year in seventh grade. In Chinese I would have understood one word in five. Mandarin for "myocardial infarction" off the top of your head, anyone?* I didn't think so. -_-;

I've actually been fairly dedicated in my Japanese studies lately. Three days in a row may not sound like much, but I think it's a good start.

Anyway! Love the Unicode, adore the Unicode, use the Unicode.


*Anyone who started studying Chinese as an adult, that is. :p

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wintersweet: Main character from Yokohama Shopping Project: Just being alive means you've made a clear profit. ☆ 人生、生きちょるだけで丸儲け. (Default)
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